A Second Painting Underneath Picasso’s “The Blue Room”

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Pablo Picasso is widely regarded as one of the greatest painters of all-time.
Pablo Picasso is widely regarded as one of the greatest painters of all-time.

Pablo Picasso was an artist who worked in early part of the 20th century. He is one of the most famous painters to have ever lived.

Recently it was discovered that underneath Picasso’s masterpiece, The Blue Room, there is another painting.

Four major art collecting institutions worked together for five years to prove the existence of the second painting, which they had long suspected.

The first clue that there were two paintings on the same canvas, was the unusual brush strokes on The Blue Room. The brushstrokes didn’t quite match the painting on The Blue Room.

To identify the second painting, the artwork was set up in front of special cameras called infrared cameras. Those cameras showed that there was something underneath the main painting.

Then using other high-tech equipment, the scientists were able to see through the first painting to one of a bearded man in a bowtie, sitting in a chair, leaning on his hand.

It was an exciting discovery. Now, people are asking many questions about the painting that Picasso covered up. Everyone wants to know who the man in the bowtie is, and why Picasso painted him.

The bowtie painting was likely completed shortly before The Blue Room painting was. Pablo Picasso was a very prolific painter. That means he painted a lot.

In order to save money, he often wouldn’t buy new canvasses for his ideas. Instead, he would simply paint over some of his other paintings.

Experts believe they will discover many more secondary paintings under Picasso’s masterpieces because today’s technology is so much more effective for this kind of work.

CURRICULUM CONNECTIONS
By Jonathan Tilly

Writing/Discussion Prompt
Today’s article explains,

“It was an exciting discovery. Now, people are asking many questions about the painting that Picasso covered up. Everyone wants to know who the man in the bowtie is, and why Picasso painted him.”

What questions do you have?

Reading Prompt: Extending Understanding
In a previous edition, TKN reported a hidden mural by Leonardo Da Vinci. How are these stories similar? How are they different? 

Primary
Extend understanding of texts by connecting the ideas in them to their own knowledge and experience, to other familiar texts, and to the world around them (OME, Reading: 1.6).

Junior
Extend understanding of texts by connecting the ideas in them to their own knowledge, experience, and insights, to other familiar texts, and to the world around them (OME, Reading: 1.6).

Intermediate
Extend understanding of texts, including increasingly complex or difficult texts, by connecting the ideas in them to their own knowledge, experience, and insights, to other familiar texts, and to the world around them (OME, Reading: 1.6).

Language Feature: Words that tell sequence
Words like “first” and “second” tell the reader the order in which things occur. They are really useful words for writers because they help the reader understand the sequence. This greatly improves the reader’s comprehension.

Tell the story of your favourite birthday using sequence words, including: first, next, later, after, before, finally.